Monthly Archives: September 2015

FTP Newsletter

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Have you enjoyed following our website?  Starting soon we will be adding a newsletter to our site which we will be emailing quarterly to anyone interested in additional infomation about fishing in the Philippines.  We plan to feature various fish species, fishing techniques and destinations around the country as well as add some additional tips and tricks. There will also be a brag board where we post photos from our followers from that quarter.

If you would like to receive the FTP (Fishing The Philippines) newsletter, please let us know via email at:

Benaiah.fogle@gmail.com

We welcome your comments suggestions and involvement in our website as we seek to promote sport fishing in the Philippines and teach the next generation how we can preserve and enjoy our waters and what’s in them!

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White Spotted Grouper ( Epinephelus coeruleopunctatus )

Epinephelus coeruleopunctatus

Common Name:  Grouper, Rockcod,

Local Name:  Lapu Lapu (Tagalog),  Pugapo (Cebuano)

Max Size:  76 cm 

Biodiversity: Marine, Reef Associated,

Depth2 – 65 m

Fishing Season:  All Year Long

Minimum Size Limit:    12 inches

Recommended Bait/Lures:  Shrimp, Squid, fish or cut bait;  jigs

IUCN Red List Status:   Not Evaluated (NE)

Dipolog City Fishing Ordinance

 

FTP would like to highlight progress in the country that is being made to protect the waters of the country as well as to promote sport fishing.  Dipolog City in Mindanao is making great progress in this area.  One such step forward was the passing a Barangay ordinance in the city’s central Barangay that established a 100 meter No Net Zone around the city’s breakwater.  The breakwater is one of Dipolog’s prime sport fishing destinations where anglers can catch many species of saltwater and brackish water fish.  Among these are the elusive Freshwater Snapper, known locally as Tandungan, Black Snapper, Mangrove Snapper, Rabbitfish, Tarpon along with many others.  The breakwater sits at the mouth of the Dipolog River and is under the jurisdiction of the city’s central barangay.

This ordinance was passed in 2006 while Angler and Tackle shop Owner Kenny Ong was the Barangay Captain.  The ordinance not only protects the anglers breakwater but also serves to minimize conflict between anglers and net fishermen.  Since its passing in 2006 this ordinance has been enforced and the breakwater has been protected against illegal net fishing within its 100 meter no net zone.  Because of this the Dipolog Breakwater has continued to be a prime sport fishing spot with the many Dipolog Anglers having caught prize fish since the establishment of the ordinance.

Steps like this are invaluable to the sport fishing community here in the Philippines as they help protect and promote healthy fishing practices.   FTP would like to see more anglers partner with LGUs around the country to implement and enforce initiatives like this one.  Hopefully in the near future anglers together with the LGUs can enforce such laws as the no electrofishing law in streams and rivers, as well as begin initiatives like a fish stocking programs to help increase the number of gamefish in rivers and lakes throughout the country.  We hope that this will be an inspiration to you and also remind you that you can make a difference.

Do you know of any similar ordinances or work that is going on in your area?  Let us know and we will highlight it and bring more awareness!

Below are attached copies of the documents for those interested in reading more on this:

no net ordinanceno net zone ordinance

Starry Triggerfish ( Abalistes stellatus )

starry triggerfish

Common Name: Triggerfish

Local Name: Papakol, Pakoy (Tagalog); Pugot, Tikos, Pakol (Bisaya)

Max Size: 60 cm

Biodiversity: Marine, Reef-Associated

Depth: 40 – 100 meters

Fishing Season: All Year Long

Minimum Size Limit: None

Recommended Bait/Lures: Shrimp, crabs, other small crustaceans, sand worms

IUCN Red List Status Status: Not Evaluated (NE)

The Starry Triggerfish is yet another beautifully patterned triggerfish species found around the Philippines.  This species is common around sandy and muddy bottoms along the coast as well as around reefs.  These fish like other species of trigger fish make a good meal once you peal away their thick skin.  The beautiful pattern on this species also makes it appealing as an aquarium fish.

This fish pictured above was caught by Steve while jigging around Cebu City.